© 2019 Northwest EcoBuilding Guild.

The Northwest Green Building Slam + Summit is presented by the Northwest EcoBuilding Guild.

2018 PRESENTATIONS

This presentation tells the story of an eight year journey developing a bottom-up housing model. The result is a village that includes 22 unique homes between 160 to 300 square feet, the result of an elaborate collaboration by an array of local builders and architects. The residents have formed a housing cooperative, and they realize affordability through pooling resources, self-management, and operating at-cost (because there is no third-party profit).

Andrew Heben, SquareOne Villages

IT TAKES A VILLAGE

Shop class is going extinct. With only three Seattle public high schools left offering woodworking and shop programs, we have to wonder: is our education system ready to bar entry to a hand-made future? We want to open every door for today’s teens, and show them that beyond those doors is an entire world dreamed up, designed, and built by people like them.

Sarah Smith/Sam Schultz, Sawhorse Revolution

TEENS TRANFORMING COMMUNITIES

Advances in tree assessment technology combined with innovative design, fitting design, and bold engineering have made tree supported structures that meet building codes more common. I will cover the current technologies in use and illustrate with several recent treehouse projects that I have been part of. With the current interest in treehouses, canopy zip line tours, and aerial adventure parks this is a timely and fascinating 10 minutes!

Scott D. Baker, Tree Solutions Inc. Consulting Arboroists

TREEHOUSES: Technically Advanced Green Structures

Our sustainable efforts to date have enabled us to significantly reduce our water use and carbon emissions, and become less reliant on carbon based fuels and grid based energy. For us to become more sustainable has been an exciting and worthwhile journey. The energy reduction retrofits to our 1987 built home were the most cost effective in reducing our energy demands, before adding the PV system, EVs, and PW2 batteries.

David Kendall, Homeowner

SIX YEAR SUSTAINABILITY QUEST PAYS OFF!

In Whatcom County, only 34% of homes are considered affordable to Median Income households. We will briefly examine the definition of affordability, with a summary of some of the current realities in the housing market. Ted will present a case study of a recent home build in Bellingham for Michael Toomes and Suneeta Eisenberg – a 2018 DOE Honorable Mention in the “Affordable” category.

Ted Clifton Jr. & Thad Johnson, TC Legend Homes

BUILDING NET ZERO HOMES TO MAKE HOUSING AFFORDABLE

This family had two tweens that needed their own bedrooms, and a home-based furniture business involving a lot of bulky inventory. They desperately needed more space!  The team soon realized that a DADU would meet all their needs. This would allow the clients to reclaim a converted bedroom and give each tween their own space, while creating a multi-functional building they can utilize for decades to come.

Laura Elfline, Mighty House Construction/Terry Phalen, Living Shelter Design

TWO TWEENS, ONE HOME BUSINEES, AND A MODEST CRAFTSMAN DIVE DEEP GREEN

OCT 25-26, 2019: UW KANE HALL, SEATTLE, WA